Axis 1: Evaluation of the complex nature of immune mechanisms induced by protozoan parasite (co)infections

Project leader

Ghislaine PREVOT

Contact

ORCID

Project 1: Parasite virulence factors underlying severe disease in Leishmaniasis

 

L. guyanensis is infected with an endosymbiotic dsRNA virus (LRV1) conferring the parasite the ability to persist in the host and to form distant secondary lesions. The LRV1 is unable to infect vertebrates but is detected by the host innate immune system. By initiating an early anti-viral immune response following the engagement of the dsRNA by TLR3 receptor, the LRV subverts anti-parasite immune responses.

We intend to:

  1. Define the molecular mechanisms involved in this process thereby establishing if LRV infection is a virulence factor associated with severe metastatic leishmaniasis.
  2. Characterize  the immune response  from patients expressing various clinical forms of L. guyanensis and L. braziliensis (using a bank of clinical samples (skin biopsies, peripheral blood cells, and sera).
  3. Identify cell modifications induced by the presence of LRV1 in macrophages infected with different Leismania strains and in skin biopsies from infected patients.
  4. Undertake genetic profiling of L. guyanensis in patient isolates carrying LRV and correlate it with immune profiles and disease outcome

People involved in the project: Ghislaine Prévot, Pierre Couppié, Romain Blézot, Marine Ginouves.

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Project leader

Sylviane PIED

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Projet 2. Molecular and cellular host–parasite crosstalk underlying protection/ pathology during malaria

 

Astrocytes and M1-like microglial cells play a prominent role for in the exacerbation of neuroinflammatory processes in cerebral malaria (CM) through parasite microvesicles transferred in Astrocytes.

Our workprogram is to:

  1. Define mechanisms of parasite microvesicle transfer to astrocytes (coll. F. Lafont and BICELL platform at CIIL).
  2. Characterize parasite microvesicles and the secretomes of glial cells (using differential metabolomics and proteomics (coll. S. Kamat, IISER Pune, India) to identify immunoregulators.
  3. Examine how pro-inflammatory astrocytes and microglia interact with brain-infiltrating myeloid cells and CD8+ T cells to give rise to neuropathology.

People involved in the project: Sylviane Pied, Ines Leleu, Fatima Hellani, Jeremy Aloo, Pierre André Caenave et Jacques Roland.

Project Leader

Magalie PIERRE DEMAR    

Contact

ORCID


Project 3: Comprehensive analysis of immunopathological processes associated  to Amazonian Toxoplasmosis


AT is characterized by severe clinical manifestations with pulmonary complications. In mice infected with T. gondii laboratory strains, chronic toxoplasmosis correlated with high levels of serum IFN-γ and MCP-1, and high lung infiltration by T cells, Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), and NK1.1+CD27+ ILCs producing copious amounts of IFN-γ and TNF-α.

To understand the disease process in AT, comprehensive phenotyping studies are planned to characterize the immune cells induced in peripheral blood, spleen, and lungs of mice infected with T. gondii virulent strains and compare these with the reference strains. In addition, parasite genotyping and investigation of its association to the type of immune response are scheduled.

This should provide insights in the role of persistent or controlled inflammation in protection/pathology and SARS during T. gondii infection.

People involved in the project: Magalie Demar, Mona Saout, Félix Djossou, Maelys Doine, Kévin Néron.

 

 


Axis 2: Study how environmental factors  influence immune responses and disease progression in the French Guiana Amazonian ecosystem

Project leader

Sylviane PIED

Contact

Project Leader

Magalie PIERRE DEMAR    

Contact

ORCID

Project 4: Understanding natural immunity in populations exposed to multiple protozoan infections

We will take advantage of the high prevalence of malaria and toxoplasmosis in the Amazonian border of FG to analyze the intricate and complex mutualistic interactions between concomitant apicomplexan infections in exposed individuals. We will investigate if a concomitant chronic T. gondii infection in malaria patients modify the fine-tuning of the host immunity and trigger resistance to severe malarial disease. A multidisciplinary approach combining clinical field studies, molecular epidemiology, systems immunology, advanced bio-informatics, and multivariate statistical analysis will be implemented to search for functional innate and adaptive immune signatures contributing to asymptomatic disease in coinfections.

People involved in the project: Sylviane Pied, Magalie Demar, Félix Djossou, Mathieu Nacher, Narcisse Elanga, Loic Epelboin, Kévin Neyron.